New Music – Winnipeg Free Press





the roots

Bonnie Wright
Just like that… (Redwing Chronicles)



Winnipeg content is found throughout Bonnie Raitt’s 18th album. The record’s first track and first song released for Americana radio stations is decisive, a faithful cover of the wrong, love-filled song by Bros. Landreth, which Joey and Dave co-wrote with Jonathan Singleton. Then there’s keyboardist Glenn Patscha, a wizard Hammond B3 from Southdale who studied with Ellis Marsalis at the University of New Orleans in the early ’90s, played jazz in New York City, co-founded Olabell and is now a respected session player, sideman and regular member of Raitt teams for flights and recording. (His solo on Wait until it blows Absolutely snappy, quickly and strikingly offset by its moody wear blame.)

Even without the local content, Just like this… This featured album is further proof of Raitt’s seemingly effortless ability to bring together sounds and styles from all eras and genres and create an unquestionable ensemble. After talking all over decisive, The California singer and guitarist presents her version of Something captures my heart, Written by Al Anderson of NRBQ. Here comes love by Lech Wierzynski of California Honey Drops flavored N’Awlins, while very strong love She was taken to tune by her late boyfriend, Tots Hebert.

Furthermore, Rhett and guitarist George Marinelli co-wrote Levin’ for the onesa loving poem for their friends lost due to the COVID-19 pandemic (including Heibert and John Prine), then Bonnie stretches herself with two heart-touching songs based on the sound – just like this, About a man looking for the mother of the boy whose heart is now beating in his chest, and down the aisle, About the love, care and dignity shown to those at the end of their lives in the nursing home. ★★★★ out of five

broadcast this: Make a decision, just like this, wait for it to blow

– John Kindle


Jazz

Carl Silvera
Porta Aberta (self-produced)

Carl Silvera is a trombone player, composer, and teacher at the University of Toronto based in Toronto. He’s been a part of the jazz world for years, but this is his first album as a leader. In the works for several years, it’s an auspicious arrival. His band here includes David French on tenor and Alison or on drums.


Silveira’s compositional style is interesting because it often allows for multiple seemingly independent parts but intertwine in wonderful and unexpected ways. Musical influences hint at many of the greats from Monk to Luxor and beyond, but always with a personal touch. The music is actually reflected in the album title which is a clever and fitting play on the lyrics. Silveira is Portuguese, but the title has two possible meanings. It can mean either “door open” in Latin or “door pressing” in Portuguese. Music sometimes makes the listener feel the need to press what at first seemed like an open door.

All this by saying that music is complex, subtle, and purely therapeutic. The title track, for example, evolves from a challenging rhythmic opening to interactions with trombone, piano, and equally “familiar” and surprising content. The journey of light, wonderful Dance can really be done if one really pays attention. Musical surprises abound. The added trick is to make the music pleasantly unpredictable, but not just a clever sleight of hand. Silvera pulls it off effortlessly.

stories like Far, and more complex tracks like Ocean And rye and lilac, It offers diverse and new sounds. While all of the members interact individually and interact well, I was really impressed by pianist Pruden. Silvera is a generous leader who gives each fellow enough time to express his thoughts. Whether he presses you or greets you, the door is a good picture of this music. Let’s hope there’s a second album in the works. ★★★★ out of five

broadcast this: Porta Aberta, rye and lilac

– Keith Black


classic

isolation
Joo Yeon sir, too
(Rubicon)

In this new release, UK-based South Korean-born violinist Joo Yeon Sir invites listeners to meet her “new comrades” she encounters in a “strange and turbulent world,” i.e. violin solo acts practicing in isolation after all live performances were abruptly canceled in 2020 due to the global pandemic.



The introspective album, featuring nine acts, shows their versatility, starting with the sad Biber Passacaglia in G minor, C 105/HB 14, Followed by my two very difficult Paganini’s: Caprice No. 10 IG Minor, Op. 1 And Caprice No. 24 in my sub. Both serve as a fascinating showcase for the artist’s bravery as she navigates her treacherous artistic demands, with the latter being particularly distinguished.

However, more contemporary fare is also offered, including a world premiere through the fog By the composer’s friend Laura Snowden, she wrote specifically for this album and was inspired by the theme of “solitude”. Its scattered spirit and complex compositional effects, including a surprising pizzicati, are highly effective, evoking the emotional, barren landscape of lockdown. Others include Roxana Panovnik hora bessarabia, Postmodern leadership of folk dance, Fadil Sai is very sharp and completely modern Cleopatra Performs with conviction.

Inspired by the love letters shared between Chris Parker and Bessie Moore during World War II, the Private Biographies Dear Bessie Explores the feelings of longing, fear, and hope, based on the timeless 1939 song Vera Lynn we will meet again, which forms the basis of its persuasive singular.

Finally, no solo program would be complete without the work of Belgian violin king Eugene Yesaye Sonata No. 6, reference 27 The album ends – literally – on a high, optimistic note, as if pleading for better days to come as the world approaches a post-pandemic era. ★★★★ out of five

stream this: My Dear Bessie, written and performed by Joo Yeon Sir

– Holly Harris

If you value coverage of Manitoba’s art scene, help us do more.
Your contribution of $10, $25 or more will allow Free Press to deepen our reporting on theatre, dance, music and galleries while also ensuring that our art journalism can reach the widest possible audience.
Be supportive of the arts and the press
Click here to learn more about the project.

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: